BOOK REVIEW: Starlings by Jo Walton

starlings-jo-waltonProlific novelist of speculative fiction,  Jo Walton, will soon debut her first collection of short stories, Starlings. In the book’s introduction, Walton explains how writing short stories is new turf for her—a struggle even—and that writing novels comes much easier. That was unexpected, since I often think of this form as an apprenticeship of sorts for writers. After Walton’s confession, I wondered if I’d be disappointed. That trepidation disappeared with a “Poof!” after polishing off the first story.

Her clever, modern fairy tales, with hues of Angela Carter, charmed the curl of my mouth into a conspiratorial smile. I fell under the spell of a man made of moonlight in “Three Twilight Tales”and the enchanted mirror who sees a whirl of trees through the seasons in “On the Wall”. I took my time and paid attention to the startling, tiny details that lurk in the shadows of plot and characterization.

Other stories showcase problems seemingly particular to Sci-Fi or dystopian settings that got me thinking about messy implications of the future. “Sleeper” delves into how the manipulation of AI simulations of historical figures could influence future generations—a perfect premise for an episode of Black Mirror. I also loved “Turnover,” in which occupiers of a spacecraft yearn to preserve their arts and culture after they’ll settle on their destination planet.

Flash fiction with sly punchlines pepper the book–most made me chuckle while others fell a bitflat. And, her Sci-Fi poems didn’t engage me as much as her stories, but that’s due to my usual struggle to connect with poetry.

I would recommend this collections to lovers of short stories instead of fans of Walton’s novels. With such varied settings and modes, it’s a book best savored story by story instead of in one or two sittings.

Now, which Walton novel should I read first? Any recommendations?

Thank you to Tachyon Publications and NetGalley for providing me with an advanced reader’s copy in exchange for an honest book review.

Rating:  ⭐⭐⭐⭐

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BOOK REVIEW: The Rules of Magic by Alice Hoffman

Rules_of_MagicLast week, Alice Hoffman delighted fans with the release of a prequel to one of her most beloved novels: Practical Magic. That’s right. Over twenty years after readers delved into the world of two unruly witch sisters, the author’s new book, The Rules of Magic, gives us a glimpse into the lives of the Owen family members who came before.

Most of the story revolves around the coming of age of Franny, Jet, and Vincent Owen during the 1960s. These two teenage witches and their wizard brother navigate rough waters as they discover their magical powers and develop intimate relationships. It’s a difficult time for them as the family curse dictates their fates. Their loves. Their lives.

While the book was fun, I found the pace of the story slow, or somewhat passive. Also, it read like a Young Adult book at times. Perhaps that’s because I young when I read and loved Practical Magic… perhaps I have  grown up and now gravitate to Hoffman’s other fantastic books, like The Museum of Extraordinary Things.

Still, I think most fans of the first book in the series will be delighted with this prequel.

Thank you to Simon & Schuster for providing me with an advanced reader’s copy in exchange for an honest book review.

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐

The Story Road 1 of 5

Introducing my short-term blogging project for SPINE Online Magazine: The Story Road: A life-long reader revisits her favourite childhood literary heroines with her 10-year-old daughter.

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Every two weeks, my daughter and I will read one of my treasured middle-grade books. We read and talk about it. Then, I blog about our experience. I’d LOVE for you to check it out!

See what we thought of A Wrinkle in Time in my blog post  “An Oddball Battles the forces of Evil”.

Support the magazine. Comments and likes welcome on my new blog!

Thanks for reading.

Up next: Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret. Stay tuned!