BOOK REVIEW: The Wolves of Winter

I’m a sucker for post-apocalyptic tales with a believable take on a world that’s taken a spin for the worst. The debut novel The Wolves of Winter by Tyrell Johnson accomplished just that, on top of a creating a growing tension that keeps the reader turning the pages.

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You’re dropped in a cold, bleak setting with a handful of characters, 20-something Lynn and her family. The sparse exposition lets you focus on the action—trudging in snow and hunting for game along with our feisty heroine. At times, Lynn seems naïve for a grown woman. Then again, she’s been living isolated in the Yukon for years with her party of five and a pervy neighbor living a few miles down the way. Playing Survivor without electricity, most modern-day comforts or news from the rest of the world is her way of life.

That is, until a secretive, stealthy stranger named Jax shows up. Not much older than Lynn, he’s the strong, silent type: hard to read, hard to trust, full of secrets. Everything changes after his arrival—he threatens their order and possibly their lives. You’ll develop a sense of what’s to come because the author drops hints and snippets of truth along the way, but you’ll probably be surprised where to story leads you.

The Wolves of Winter is a fast read and tons of fun. I recommend you grab a copy when the novel is released in January 2018.

Thank you to Simon & Schuster Canada for providing me with an advanced reader’s copy in exchange for an honest book review.

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

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BOOK REVIEW: Top 5 reasons to read Artemis by Andy Weir

Artemis-Book-Cover-Andy-WeirAndy Weir’s debut novel, The Martian, was an out-of-this-world hit. Fans loved the plot, the tension, and the humour—but can the author deliver yet another outer space story that’s as fun and successful as the first?

He sure can! I’ve had the joy of reading an advanced copy of his sophomore book Artemis. It hits bookstores on November 14, 2017, and I’ve listed the Top 5 reasons fans of Weir will love it.

 

5.  The setting is a not-so-distant-future Moon city, Artemis. Regardless of the challenges due to lack of air, abrasive moon dust and lethal radiation, Artemis is home to a couple thousand inhabitants and has a thriving tourism industry. This remote place—made up of large, connected domes—feels real, so you can easily imagine where all the action takes place.

4.  Every sci-fi book needs a geeky sidekick to help solve pressing, techie problems. Svaboda fits the bill with his quirky personality. His latest invention alone is sure to make you chuckle.

3.  When compared to Earth, there’s only 1/6 of gravity on the moon. This difference adds an element of fun in various scenes—from travelling in heavy gear to fighting off the bad guys. It also gives new meaning the phrases “kids bouncing off the walls”.

2.  The hero of the story, Jazz Bashara, is as likable as Mark Watney (played by Matt Damon in The Martian film adaptation). She’s a sassy badass full of pluck and clever ideas (some good, some bad). I welcome strong female characters in any sci-fi adventure. And hey, Ransom star Nazneen Contractor would be a dead ringer for Jazz in the Artemis movie. Casting directors take note.

1.  The plot has all the classic elements of a heist, yet has a new twist. Who doesn’t like a fast-paced sci-fi caper about misfits with a risky, urgent plan? A plan that feels like mission impossible? Zooming through this book with a smirk on your face—guaranteed.

Thank you to Crown Publishing for providing me with an advanced reader’s copy in exchange for an honest book review.

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

BOOK REVIEW: The Rules of Magic by Alice Hoffman

Rules_of_MagicLast week, Alice Hoffman delighted fans with the release of a prequel to one of her most beloved novels: Practical Magic. That’s right. Over twenty years after readers delved into the world of two unruly witch sisters, the author’s new book, The Rules of Magic, gives us a glimpse into the lives of the Owen family members who came before.

Most of the story revolves around the coming of age of Franny, Jet, and Vincent Owen during the 1960s. These two teenage witches and their wizard brother navigate rough waters as they discover their magical powers and develop intimate relationships. It’s a difficult time for them as the family curse dictates their fates. Their loves. Their lives.

While the book was fun, I found the pace of the story slow, or somewhat passive. Also, it read like a Young Adult book at times. Perhaps that’s because I young when I read and loved Practical Magic… perhaps I have  grown up and now gravitate to Hoffman’s other fantastic books, like The Museum of Extraordinary Things.

Still, I think most fans of the first book in the series will be delighted with this prequel.

Thank you to Simon & Schuster for providing me with an advanced reader’s copy in exchange for an honest book review.

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐

THE HISTORY OF BEES: A collapse of epic proportions

The History of BessThe History of Bees shares the stories of three different families, living in three different eras, whose lives are shaped by both the breeding and survival of bees. While Maja Lunde’s gripping novel is aptly titled, it could have been called Collapse.

In a 19th-century scientist’s story, the dream to make a name for oneself and leaving a legacy always seems to be on the brink of collapse. In the second story, an apiarist struggles during the onset of the terrifying Colony Collapse Disorder in 2007. Collapse takes on a darker meaning in the third story—set 80 years in a the future in a dystopian world without bees. In all narratives, the potential collapse of bonds between parent and children, husbands and wives, compels the reader to turn each page to find out what fate awaits them.

While some big twists are predictable early on, other little turns will astonish the reader. A thought-provoking read filled with tension, relatable characters, and an urgent message to protect our bees now and for generations to come.

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

*** Thank you to Simon & Schuster Canada for sending me a galley of this novel in exchange for an honest review.***

My essay about being a 40-year-old intern

I’ve been on a hiatus from writing book reviews for several months, but I’m still reading and dissecting works. See, I’ve been focusing on reading essays and long reads. I switched gears by spending my free time writing, editing, and reworking essays—you know the drill. So, my book reviewing has been pushed to the side for now. For a while. Not forever.

GandMWhile I’ve had short works published in local literary magazines, I’ve never had anything published on a national scale—until now. I hope you’ll read my essay in today’s installment of Facts & Arguments in The Globe and Mail.

Shout out to the editor, Jane Gadd, for this opportunity and to Jori Bolton for the lovely illustration.

BBT’s Best Books of 2015: Historical Novels

In 2015, three novels of historical fiction stood out form the pack. Or should I say, the bookshelf. Their authors reimagined the loves and trials of prominent figures from the past. In each case, the reader gets to delve into the minds of the characters to find out what emotions and influences that set them on their paths. Warning: these books are so good, fiction may just become better than reality.

All TruAllTrueNotALieInIte Not a Lie in It by Alix Hawley blew me away. It examines the life and trials of Daniel Boone in a fresh, new light. So many gorgeous passages. Heart-stopping narration. Don’t want to take my word for it? Well, it won the 2015 Amazon.ca First Novel award in May. This fall, it was longlisted for the prestigious Scotiabank Giller Prize. Read my review, then check out the author’s blog for more info about her writing process and fun facts about Daniel Boone. Then, get your hands on the novel. If you get sad when you finish reading it, take solace in knowing that Hawley is working on the sequel as we speak.

 

MarriageofOppositesIf you’ve been following my blog, you may know that I love author Alice Hoffman‘s work. She delivers. Every. Time. It’s no surprise that her latest novel, The Marriage of Opposites, made my list of 2015’s best historical novels. It is the story of the Impressionist painter Camille Pissarro and his family. Inspired by Latin American literature, this multi-generational story is laced with bursts of passion and shades of magic realism. Oh, and the ending? It’s perfect.

 

The mytholoVanessa_Cover_Onegy of Virginia Woolf has been the subject of several films and books over the years. Vanessa and Her Sister by Priya Parmar can be added to that list under the heading “inventive point of view”. The epistolary novel is made up primarily of fictional journal entries by Virginia’s older sister, Vanessa.  Under the suffocating shadow of her sister, Vanessa finds the strength to grow as an artist, a mother, and a lover. Reading her story through journals, letters, and postcards was an intimate, memorable experience. I read the book and wrote a review nearly a year ago, but still find myself thinking about the characters today.

What was your favourite historic novel of 2015?

BBT’s Best Books of 2015: Favorite YA Books

Molecules_CoverMy favorite YA novel of 2015—BY FAR—was We Are All Made of Molecules by Susin Nielsen. It’s a story of two very different people—Stewart and Ashley—who must eventually join forces it they want to make their newly-meshed family work. The book’ll make you laugh out loud and sob aching sobs. I wrote a gushing review back in May claiming that with yet another great title under her belt, Susin Nielsen is quickly becoming the John Green of Canada. I still think that’s true. If you have young teens on your holiday gift list, grab this book (Full of feels!) for each of them. Girls and guys will like it. So will you!

Issues tackled: divorce, bullying, sexual harassment, homosexuality, mourning

 

Cover_AnnAngelAnother great YA read was an engaging collection of short stories about teenage secrets.  Things I’ll Never Say: Stories About Our Secret Selves was edited by Ann Angel—curator of fells, laughs, and ah-ha moments. These stories vary in style and genre, but each one shows us how the struggles of teens deeply impact their emotional lives. Read my review to learn about my three favourite stories. It’s a must-read collection for teens, teachers, and parents alike.

Issues tackled: hoarding, teen pregnancy, sexually transmitted deseases, eating disorders, friendship